Half of Cancer Survivors Die From Other Conditions

  • 0

    Half of Cancer Survivors Die From Other Conditions

    Many people fear that a cancer diagnosis carries an almost certain death sentence. But a new national study shows nearly half of cancer survivors die from other conditions.

  • 0

    Can Being Tall Raise Your Risk of Ovarian Cancer?

    Taller women may be more likely to develop ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.

  • 0

    Common Diabetes Drug May Fight Cancer

    The diabetes drug metformin — commonly a first choice for controlling blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes — is sparking new interest as a cancer fighter.

  • 0

    Eat Broccoli (or Bok Choy), Beat Breast Cancer?

    Women with breast cancer who eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables may be more likely to live longer and less likely to have their cancer come back, a large study suggests.

  • 0

    Dogs May Take the Bite Out of Stress at Work

    Bringing your dog to work may take the bite out of stress and improve overall job satisfaction for the whole office.

  • 0

    Gene Mapping for Healthy People No ‘Crystal Ball’

    Mapping a person’s whole genome cannot, for the most part, accurately predict the medical problems in a healthy person’s future, a new study suggests.

  • 0

    Obesity Rate in U.S. Higher Than Thought?

    New research suggests that almost 40% of Americans who are classified as overweight may actually be obese

  • 0

    Mammograms Spot Cancers That May Not Be Dangerous

    A new study suggests that routine mammograms, long pitched to women as lifesaving tests, may also be causing substantial harm.

  • 0

    7 Dangerous Games Parents Must Know About

    The choking game and the cinnamon challenge are among the risky “games” that kids and teens may play — and that parents need to know about, experts tell WebMD.

  • 0

    Some Americans Are Not Getting Essential Nutrients

    Most Americans are getting recommended amounts of vitamins, iron, and other essential elements in their diets, but women and some racial and ethnic groups may be low in certain key nutrients, a new government report shows.